How to use Remote Desktop Software on the iPhone 5

There are some juicy rumors circulating about the iPhone 5 – and with the products that Apple has produced over the past years, it comes as no surprise that there is speculation as to what new groundbreaking products the company will churn out next. One of the more notable rumors is that the iPhone 5 will feature remote-desktop functionality.

There are some juicy rumors circulating about the iPhone 5 – and with the products that Apple has produced over the past years, it comes as no surprise that there is speculation as to what new groundbreaking products the company will churn out next. One of the more notable rumors is that the iPhone 5 will feature remote-desktop functionality.

Certainly the iPhone and iPad are revolutionizing the mobile-phone and tablet sectors, respectively. Many claim that Apple has outdone itself with these pieces of technology, and that its stock-market share prices can only go down because the company will not be able to live up to its own achievements. But if the remote-desktop rumors about the iPhone 5 turn out to be true, apple will likely see another burst of intense growth in the phone sector.

Remote desktop capability on the iPhone 5 is tied closely to what is called “Near Field Communications,” or NFC, which could also allow people to use the phone as a “tap-and-go” style e-wallet, to be used at points of purchase such as retail store checkouts. While ta-and-go functionality is exciting, NFC technology would be even more valuable in the context of <remote desktop software.

The first embodiment of using NFT for remote desktop software is that the iPhone 5 could be used essentially as a key to access one’s personal desktop settings on any given Mac desktop. In this scenario, the user’s desktop settings are stored on the iPhone, which when in proximity with a new desktop, would allow the new desktop to access the settings in order to appear and behave the same as the user’s own personal computer. Such settings that would be stored on the iPhone include one’s internet bookmarks, desktop background, and other various customizations.

While this is all good news, the ability to customize any desktop to look like your at-home desktop is not going to be a game-changer. What could be a disruptive technology, though, is if along with the aforementioned customizations, an iPhone could be used to unlock one’s own “Home” folder at any desktop. This would essentially mean that the iPhone could be used as a digital key, and that all Macs would essentially be outfitted with remote access software, out-of-box.

What would take this technology to even the next level would be to allow the desktop to tether to the iPhone’s internet connection to access the “home” folder. This way, it would not be necessary to have the desktop connected to the internet in order to access one’s personal files. If it is available, this technology would make the iPhone 5 an indispensible pc remote access tool. In this scenario, Apple would certainly not have to worry about having outdone itself in 2010.

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This entry was posted on Monday, June 13th, 2011 at 2:05 pm and is filed under General, Technology. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.