How to Immigrate to Ireland

Whether you have Irish ancestors, or you simply love the country, Ireland is a great place to visit or live. Recent years have seen an increase in the number of people immigrating to Ireland. The reasons are varied, from employment to education to those seeking long-term immigration status. The process varies as well, according to the reason for your request. Use these steps to learn how to immigrate to Ireland.

Steps

Employment

1. Research Ireland immigration laws pertaining to your country of residence. Each country has it’s own set of rules. Information can be obtained through the Immigrant Council of Ireland.

2. Obtain employment in a category that allows you to have a Green Card. This includes nurses, IT professionals and other highly skilled workers.

  • The Department of Enterprise has created a list outlining the positions which qualify. It can be obtained from their website. They can also provide information on work permits.
3. Apply for a Green Card. This can be done by you or your employer. Green Cards are valid for a period of 2 years and there is a fee of 1,000 euro (approximately 1,440 USD). This fee can be paid by either you or your employer.

4. Determine whether a visa will be required for you to enter Ireland. The Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service can provide this information.

  • Apply for your visa at an Irish Embassy or Consulate. This visa allows you to seek entry to Ireland, it does not guarantee it.
5. Register with the immigration authorities. You will receive a Certificate of Registration that is valid for 1 year and your passport will be stamped. A fee of 150 euro (approximately 216 USD) will be collected.

  • This fee must be paid again when you re-register the following year.

Education

6. Determine whether your student status in Ireland would fall under the Degree Programme or the Language and Non-Degree Programme. New guidelines were put into place in 2010 dividing the regulation of students.

  • Make sure that you meet the qualifications under the specific educational programme. These can be found through the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service.
7. Contact the Naturalisation and Immigration Service to determine from your country of residence whether or not you must apply for a visa.

8. Apply for your visa at an Irish Embassy or Consulate. This visa will allow you only to seek entry to Ireland, it does not guarantee it.

9. Register with the immigration authorities after you enter Ireland. You will receive a Certificate of Registration that is valid for 1 year and your passport will be stamped. A fee of 150 euro (approximately 216 USD) will be collected.

  • This fee must be paid again when you re-register the following year.

Long-Term Immigration

10. Determine whether you qualify for long-term immigration. Allowable situations include spouses/dependents of Irish citizens and workers legally presiding in Ireland for more than 5 years.

11. Apply for long-term status through the Irish Naturlisation and Immigration Service. Documents required will include work permits, visas, Certificate of Registration, passport and proof of relationship or residency. There is a fee of 500 euro (approximately 719 USD).

  • The process for long-term status may take up to 6 months to complete.
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This entry was posted on Wednesday, November 16th, 2011 at 12:56 am and is filed under Immigration. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.